Coatings breakthrough with RubberDecky

RubberDecky, Winner, Editors Choice award, Cocrtete Technology Today Magazine.

Product review. Reprinted from “Concrete Technology Today” Issue May ’09 Editor’s choice, discovered at the World of Concrete.

RubberDecky-Cocrete-Technology-today-article-1RubberDecky is the non-cementious, universal overlay that adheres to virtually any substrate without the need for first grinding, or shot blasting the surface.

Based on proven European technologies, RubberDecky uses nano-technology and molecular bonding to adhere to any substrate. This replaces the older physical adhesion model that has been used to date. This “green” and energy efficient coating makes construction projects easier and less expensive to do. It is applied by roller, brush or spray to any clean, dry and tight substrate for use as a simple, walk-able, flexible decorative resurfacing system over existing, weak, leaking or failed substrates. “RubberDecky” is a liquid applied, waterproof, deck surface that looks like concrete requiring little surface prep. RubberDecky can also be faux finished for any desired appearance and is used to renew old decks at a fraction of the cost of traditional remove and replace methods.

It is made in the field by adding a pigment and grit to PerfectPrimerR, which is then finished with the sealer. This method creates a simple, elegant deck system designed to resurface wooden, concrete, metal deck and roof surfaces while allowing for light pedestrian traffic. When combined with their fabric, it converts any deck into a height-less, weight-less decorative and waterproofing system in one.

On rooftops, RubberDecky is used as a waterproof roofing material saves up to 20 percent of building energy costs. RubberDecky applies over virtually any clean, dry and tight surface including linoleum, foam roofs or walls, VCT, tile, asphalt flat roof membranes, painted interior or exterior floors. It requires no special tools or skills and applies without odors, noise, mess, demolition or heavy equipment. Unlike concrete, it flexes and moves, never cracks and it leaves the surface waterproof while still allowing it to breathe.

Concrete Technology Today magazine is published by Trade Link Media Pte Ltd in Singapore. This article originally appeared in their Vol. 3, 2009, edition.